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Archive for October, 2014

worry_lg

We all worry. But here’s something to think about:

If you worry and the thing you worried about happens, then your worrying didn’t prevent it. If you worry about something and it doesn’t happen, you worried for nothing. Either way, worrying is a waste of time.

Jesus said to His disciples, “For this reason I say to you, do not worry about your life, as to what you will eat; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothing. And which of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life’s span? If then you cannot do even a very little thing, why do you worry about other matters?” (Luke 12:22-25)

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K105049

This morning I had the privilege of  preaching on John 1:29-34. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: According to John the Baptist’s expert testimony, Jesus is the Lamb of God, the One who baptizes in the Holy Spirit, and the Son of God.

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52102-bigthumbnailThe thorn on the rose-bush is the purposed friend and not the enemy of the rose. The flower is all the more surely perfected because the thorn remains. And so it is with the thorns of the soul. By the very retention of the thorn, faith is nourished and ordered, and the power and the faculty to apprehend the glory of God when He is pleased to reveal it. And thus are we led to the all-sufficiency of the grace of the Father in Heaven. (John Henry Jowett)

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sunshine_raindrops

Today was a typical fall day, as far as weather is concerned in the Pacific Northwest. We had rain (sometimes heavy and sometimes light), clouds (dark and light), and sunshine which was quite bright at times. This pattern repeated itself numerous times.

Days like these are a reminder that life is not made up of only sunshine, only clouds, or only rain. Every life has a mixture of all three, sometimes at the same time or in the same day. As it has been said, a life made up of nothing but sunshine becomes a desert. Rain and clouds bring growth and sustenance. We need all three, even though we don’t like it. God, in His providence, graciously gives us exactly what we need, whether it be sunshine, clouds, or rain – sometimes all three in the same day.

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I had the privilege this morning of preaching on John 1:19-28. Here is a summary of my sermon in the space of one sentence: In terms of evangelism, John the Baptist teaches us that in order to witness effectively, we must know the condition of man, know our identity, mission, and authority, and be honest and straightforward.

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holding-hands

If you’re married, you need to read this article by R.C. Sproul, Jr.! Please read it. You’ll be glad you did.

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This morning I had the privilege of preaching on John 1:15-18. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: Jesus is supreme, sufficient, and makes the Father known.

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Number5-2-L502

I’ve begun preaching through the Gospel of John and thought I’d pass along five good commentaries on the book. They’re not listed in order of importance or worth.

  1. John (from the Moody Gospel Commentary series) by J. Carl Laney. A unique feature is helpful tips for teachers and pastors.
  2. The Gospel of John by William Hendriksen. Thorough and scholarly, yet readable.
  3. The Gospel of John by James Montgomery Boice (5 volumes). Well done expositions (originally sermons) from an excellent preacher.
  4. The Gospel According to John by D.A. Carson. Technical at points, but practical, too.
  5. The Gospel According to John (from the New International Commentary on the New Testament) by Leon Morris. Excellent. Has become the standard work on John according to many.

Tolle lege!

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I had the privilege this morning of preaching on the last half of John 1:14. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: In His incarnation, Jesus made visible God’s invisible character and attributes, in particular His grace and truth.

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I have a lot of books. People will frequently ask me if I’ve read all of them. The answer, with some guilt on my part, has always been that I haven’t. Based on my answer, the assumption is made that I shouldn’t buy any more books until I’ve read all of the books I now own. But I may have a better answer (and feeling) after reading a piece by Ian Carmichael. You can read it here.

Yes, I have a lot of books, and no, I haven’t read them all, and yes, I plan on buying more.

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