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Archive for the ‘glorifying God’ Category

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I had the privilege this morning of hearing Pastor Keith Thomas of Bridge City Fellowship preach on Matthew 25:14-30. Here is a summary of his sermon in one sentence: God’s infinite generosity should motivate us to make the most of every talent, ability, and opportunity He gives us.

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This morning I had the privilege of preaching on Philippians 1:18b-26. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: The gospel advances whether we live or die, and when we live, Jesus Christ is the hub around which everything else revolves.

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I had the privilege of preaching on 1 Corinthians 6:9-11 this morning. A one-sentence summary of my sermon is: God’s design for gender and sexuality is being restored in those whom He has graciously saved and who are in the process of being sanctified.

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This morning, I had the privilege of preaching on Genesis 2:18-25 (“God’s Design for Marriage” in a series called “God’s Design for Gender and Sexuality”). Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: God designed marriage to be a blessing, with a specific pattern, sequence, and order – all for His glory and our good.

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The goal is not conformity to a standard; it’s loving the standard.

Those are the words of Doug Wilson as he gives advice to parents wrestling with the question of whether or not to give their children smart phones (and at what age).

He’s not against standards (no Christian should be). We all have standards to which we must conform. Those include “house rules,” the laws of the land, and ultimately the Law of God. The issue (and this is what I liked so much) is deeper than simply obedience versus disobedience, conformity on the one hand and non-conformity on the other. The issue is where does this conformity of obedience to the standard come from?

We all know how easy it is to obey on the outside and be in complete raging rebellion on the inside (in our heart). To put it another way, obedience can be external without the heart being “in it,” so to speak.

The goal – the deeper goal, the goal that makes the most difference in the long run – is to love and delight in the standard. If that happens, conformity to the standard will follow. If the heart (from where delight springs) is right, actions will follow.

Psalm 1 begins like this: How blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, nor stand in the path of sinners, nor sit in the seat of the scoffers! But his delight is in the law of the Lord, and in His law he meditates day and night (vv. 1-2).

Psalm 40:8 takes it one step further, as it says, I delight to do Your will, O my God; Your Law is within my heart. A delight in the Law of God produces obedience to it.

If, in our hearts, we delight in God’s Law (and love it), and in the One who gave it, we’ll conform to the standard. Delighting in God’s Law/Word means that we desire it, and derive great pleasure and joy from it. We love God’s Law and delight in it because we know that God always has our good and His glory in mind, and that He knows exactly what He’s doing.

Here’s a question for dads and moms: Do your children know the reasons behind God’s Law and your house rules? Do they know that both standards (yours and God’s) are meant to help the household operate in a way that’s orderly and glorifies God? Are they (and you) aware that it’s dangerous to confuse God’s Law with your house rules? Something to think about.

Here’s a question for churches: Are we simply telling God’s people to “conform to the standard,” or are we urging them to “love the standard”? Another thing to think about.

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One of the most precious, and possibly memorized, passages in all of Scripture is Proverbs 3:5-6 – “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct your paths.”

The positive command is to trust God, and that with all of our mind, affections, will, and our bodies. In other words, we trust God with everything we are, our whole being. This is the main point of these two verses.

The other side of the coin – the negative command – is not to trust ourselves. The point is that we can either trust (lean on) ourselves or we can trust (lean on) God. In our sinfulness and fallenness, we don’t have all the facts and we don’t know what we don’t know.

The commands of verse 5 are followed by the promise of verse 6. If we acknowledge God as we trust Him, He promises to direct our paths. He’ll give us wisdom if we trust Him rather than ourselves.

In His Word, God gives us a number of negative examples, like Abram. Genesis 12:10-20 records Abram (before God changed his name to Abraham) going to Egypt with his wife Sarai to escape a famine. To keep themselves safe, they came up with a scheme: they’d tell everyone they were brother and sister, not husband and wife. They leaned on their own understanding, didn’t trust God, and didn’t acknowledge Him (until the end). They thought their plan was better. It clearly wasn’t. Abram and Sarai sinned in their lying and deception. Yes, God used it in His providence, but they sinned by not trusting God with their circumstances.

God’s promise remains firm and reliable – He will direct our paths and give us wisdom in any and every situation we face. God’s command remains firm and reliable, too – Trust Him with all your heart, not yourself, and acknowledge Him. We need to look no further than our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, who exemplified Proverbs 3:5-6, for ourselves and for the church. We trust God for His glory and our good!

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This morning, I had the privilege of preaching on John 17:13-16. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: As believers in the Lord Jesus Christ, we are in the world but not of the world, joyfully.

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