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Archive for the ‘Ministry’ Category

congregation

“And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near” (Heb. 10:24-25 ESV).

We should go to church because we need it, but also because our brothers and sisters in Christ need it, too. Yes, we gather together to worship the Triune God. No, it isn’t a solitary endeavor, however. We “stir up one another to love and good works,” and encourage each other by our attendance and involvement. They need us and we need them.

When you go to church, greet people warmly and with a smile. You may be the only person who’s greeted them that way all week.

When you sing (even if it’s a song you don’t like), sing it anyway. You may encourage someone who wonders if it’s possible to praise God in their circumstances.

When you sing a song you like, sing it fervently. You may motivate someone near you to sing with all of their heart.

When you pray along with someone else, say “amen” so it can be heard. You may strengthen the faith of someone who isn’t sure if God answers prayer.

When you listen to a sermon, pay careful attention with an open Bible on your lap. You may encourage someone who read and study  God’s Word every chance they got but has slacked off lately.

When you talk to people, show genuine interest in them and ask them how they’re doing.  You may encourage them to do the same.

You never know the impact and influence of simple acts simple acts during a worship service. You need the church and the church needs you.

(This post was inspired by a series of tweets written by Garrett Kell.)

 

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weary

“Encourage one another daily” (Hebrews 3:13)

Sometimes it’s tough to keep going, especially when you don’t see results. That’s true in life and ministry. We feel like we’re banging our head against a wall and we want to quit. Besides that, it hurts!

Listen to Paul’s encouragement in Galatians 6:9: “Let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we will reap if we do not grow weary.” We should keep doing what’s good and right even if we fell like giving up because we’re not seeing any results. If we maintain our faithfulness the results – God’s results, not ours necessarily – will come at some time.

William Carey, called “the Father of Modern Missions,” labored for seven years in India before baptizing his first convert. Mary Drewery, in her biography of Carey, said, “The actual number of conversions directly attributable to him is pathetically small; the number indirectly attributable to him must be legion.”

Adinoram Judson, America’s first missionary, labored for seven years in Burma before seeing his first convert.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Nott spent twenty-two years laboring on the island of Tahiti as missionaries before Pomare II was baptized on May 16th, 1819.

Don’t lose heart and don’t grow weary as you continue to do good – as you plant, water, and tend. In God’s time you’ll reap.

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simple_world_maps_vector_578782

I had the privilege this morning of hearing Pastors Rick Elzinga and Mitch Lamotte preach on “What We Value: Evangelism.” Here is a summary of their sermon in one sentence: We support preaching the gospel to all people, obeying the Creation Mandate and Great Commission, helping the hurting and struggling among us, and desire to partner with like-minded ministries and churches to further these ends.

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Theology of BC

There are plenty of misconceptions about what is called “biblical counseling.” “Take a Bible verse and call me in the morning,” “Everything comes down to your sin – repent of it and everything will be fine,” and “Stop taking your medication because it’s ultimately a spiritual problem,” are just a few of those misconceptions. Others aren’t even aware that an alternative to secular psychotherapy and counseling even exists. The sad part is that through misunderstanding and ignorance, a useful tool is not being utilized.

Heath Lambert, the Executive Director of The Association of Certified Biblical Counselors, has done the church a tremendous favor by writing A Theology of Biblical Counseling: The Doctrinal Foundations of Counseling Ministry. Biblical Counseling, which has existed as a discipline since the 1970’s, has specific theological underpinnings, which Lambert explains. (By the way, so does secular counseling.) He deals with the usual categories of theology (Scripture, God, Jesus, Holy Spirit, man, sin, salvation, the church, etc.) and tells us how it relates to counseling someone using the Bible as the final authority. One of the most interesting aspect of the book are the case studies Lambert includes in most chapters, which adds “flesh and bones” to doctrine.

If you have questions about biblical counseling or have written it off in the past, please read this book. When you do, you will have read a clear presentation of biblical counseling and will know its theological foundation. You’ll have an informed opinion. If you’re committed to the practice and discipline of biblical counseling, please read this book. It’s more than a method or a strategy for counseling, it has a secure theological foundation faithful to Scripture, which is important to remember. If you’ve never heard of biblical counseling, please read this book. You’ll learn a lot about Biblical counseling, but even more about God and His Word!

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weary

Then Gideon and the 300 men who were with him came to the Jordan and crossed over, weary yet pursuing (Judges 8:4).

The Midianites had oppressed Israel for seven years. In response to the cries and prayers of His people, God raised up Gideon as a judge and deliverer. After paring down Gideon’s army from 32,000 to a mere 300, God told him to pursue the Midianites and promised him victory.

That doesn’t mean it was easy, however. Gideon and his men, the Scripture says, were “weary yet pursuing” the Midianites. In the English Standard Version, weary is translated as “exhausted.”

We all get tired. We all become weary, even to the point of exhaustion. And the truth of the matter is that we can become weary, even if we’re doing precisely what God has commanded us to do – when we’re obedient to His will. Obedience doesn’t make us immune to weariness and exhaustion. That was true for Gideon and his men and it’s true for us. The weariness could be physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual (or any combination), but it happens and it’s real.

Gideon and his 300 men were weary, but they kept going – they pressed on and pursued by the power of the Holy Spirit and ultimately gained the promised victory.

In Isaiah 40:28-31, we have God’s promise and a good dose of hope for the weary:

Do you not know? Have you not heard?
The Everlasting God, the Lord, the Creator of the ends of the earth
Does not become weary or tired.
His understanding is inscrutable.
 He gives strength to the weary,
And to him who lacks might He increases power.
Though youths grow weary and tired,
And vigorous young men stumble badly,
Yet those who wait for the Lord
Will gain new strength;
They will mount up with wings like eagles,
They will run and not get tired,
They will walk and not become weary.

When you’re weary, continue to pursue in the power of God’s Spirit. In the words of J.I. Packer, “Trust God and get going.”

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therefore-we-ought-to-support-people-like-these-that-we-may-be-fellow-worke-esv14665

I had the privilege this morning of hearing Darren Carlson, founder of President of Teaching Leaders International, preach on 3 John 1-8. Here is a summary of his sermon in one sentence: A faithful church receives and sends missionaries for the glory of God.

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covenant

I had the privilege this morning of hearing Doug Lundin, one of the elders, preach on “Covenanting Together” from 2 Kings 23:1-3, which included the elder’s and pastor’s commitment to us. Here is a summary of his sermon in one sentence: The covenant was a renewal of the heart, the Word, leadership, holiness, and communion with one another.

 

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