Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘unbelief’ Category

6a00e3981f1e39883301310f1e2514970c-500wi

I had the privilege this morning of preaching the fourth sermon in a short series on God’s Design for Gender and Sexuality. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: As Christians, we must respond to transgenderism and transgender people (and everyone else for that matter) with clarity, conviction, and compassion.

Read Full Post »

sinis

I had the privilege this morning of preaching on Romans 1:18-32 (as part of a short series on gender and sexuality from God’s perspective). Here is a summary of my sermon in the space of one sentence: God’s design for mankind and marriage, along with everything else, has been corrupted by man’s sin.

Read Full Post »

Popular author Jen Hatmaker is, and has been, on a trajectory toward unbelief and apostasy for some time. Her interview with Religion News Service has brought it out into the open for everyone to see. You can read it here. I’m not judging what’s in her heart, but in her statements and beliefs, she’s left orthodox, biblical Christianity.

Denny Burk has a well-thought out response here.

As a result, Lifeway announced that Hatmaker’s publications can be no longer be purchased in their stores or online. Baptist Press has the story here. Lifeway published several of Hatmaker’s books and resources.

The trajectory of unbelief is not hard to spot in most cases. It usually begins with a rejection (either a “soft” rejection or a “hard” rejection) of the authority of God’s Word, the Bible. After that, doctrines clearly taught in Scripture and held by the church for two millennia begin  to fall like so many dominoes. When emotions and feelings (which characterize our times) are added to the recipe, the movement of the trajectory goes to warp speed.

Pray for Jen. Pray for yourself and your church and the church in general. May our trajectory be one of faithfulness and belief.

Read Full Post »

Hence we may infer, that the human mind is, so to speak, a perpetual forge of idols.

The human mind, stuffed as it is with presumptuous rashness, dares to imagine a god suited to its own capacity; as it labours under dullness, nay, is sunk in the grossest ignorance, it substitutes vanity and an empty phantom in the place of God. To these evils another is added. The god whom man has thus conceived inwardly he attempts to embody outwardly. The mind, in this way, conceives the idol, and the hand gives it birth. That idolatry has as its origin in the idea which men have, that God is not present with them unless the presence is carnally exhibited, appears from the example of the Israelites: “Up,” said they, “make us gods, which shall go before us; for as for this Moses, the man that brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we wet not what is become of him,” (Exod. 22:1). They knew, indeed, that there was a God whose mighty power they had experienced in so many miracles, but they had no confidence of his being near to them, if they did not with their eyes behold a corporeal symbol of his presence, as an attestation of his actual government.

In consequence of this blind passion men have, almost in all ages since the world began, set up signs on which they imagined that God was visibly depicted to their eyes.

(John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion; Book 1.3.8) 

Read Full Post »

In my reading of Luke 1 this morning, something jumped out at me – the contrasts between Mary and Zechariah. One young, the other old. One female, the other male. One a commoner, the other a priest. One betrothed, the other married. Perhaps the biggest contrast between the two of them, though, is Mary’s faith and Zechariah’s lack of faith.

After the angel Gabriel told Zechariah that he and his wife, Elizabeth, would have a son (a child they had been praying for fervently), the priest said, “How shall I know this? For I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years” (Luke 1:18). Not exactly a faith-filled statement. Gabriel tells him, “you will be silent and unable to speak until the day that these things take place, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their time” (Luke 1:20).

Mary, on the other hand, had no such unbelief. Yes, she did ask Gabriel “How will this be, since I am a virgin?” (Luke 1:34) But she obviously trusted God to do what He had promised through Gabriel, because of her reply – “Behold, I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38). The mother of Jesus trusted God and submitted to Him, even though she couldn’t have fully understood what the rest of her life would entail.

A postscript: Zechariah didn’t continue in his unbelief – read Luke 1:57-79.

Read Full Post »