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Archive for the ‘Jesus Christ’ Category

Acts16-31_FrankDetrick-web

I had the privilege this morning of preaching on Acts 16:6-40 as I begin a new series in the book of Philippians. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: In the beginning of the church in Philippi, the sovereignty of God is pervasive and undeniable.

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This morning I had the privilege of preaching on Romans 4:25. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: Both the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ are necessary for our sins to be forgiven and for us to be declared righteous by God, with repentance and belief in Christ being absolutely necessary to experience those benefits.

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Psalm-2

This morning I had the privilege of preaching on the Triumphal Entry of Jesus into Jerusalem from Psalm 2. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: God responded to the rebellion of fallen humanity by installing His Son as King – submit to Him while there’s still time.

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the-wrath-of-god

What is the wrath of God? It’s one of God’s attributes, but we may not hear much about it.

The wrath of God is His settled, righteous, perfect, holy, anger against sin. He is intensely angry at all sin and evil.

“For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who suppress the truth [l]in unrighteousness” (Rom. 1:18).

“He who believes in the Son has eternal life; but he who does not [j]obey the Son will not see life, but the wrath of God abides on him” (John 3:36).

For we have been consumed by Your anger
and by Your wrath we have been dismayed.
You have placed our iniquities before You,
our secret sins in the light of Your presence.
For all our days have declined in Your fury;
we have finished our years like a sigh.
 (Ps. 90:7-9)

“If we do not preach about sin and God’s judgment on it, we cannot present Christ as Saviour from sin and the wrath of God. and if we are silent about these things, and preach a Christ who only saves only from self and the sorrows of this world, we are not preaching the Christ of the Bible” (J.I. Packer).

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I had the privilege this morning of preaching on John 21:24-25. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: The Gospel of John, as well as the entire Bible, is authentic, authoritative, and sufficient.

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JC-Ryle

 So when they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me more than these?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Tend My lambs.”  He said to him again a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Shepherd My sheep.”  He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time, “Do you love Me?” And he said to Him, “Lord, You know all things; You know that I love You.” Jesus said to him, “Tend My sheep.” (John 21:15-17)

J.C. Ryle comments about this passage saying:

We should notice first, in these verses, Christ’s question to Peter–“Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Three times we find the same inquiry made. It seems most probable that this three-fold repetition was meant to remind the Apostle of his own thrice-repeated denial. Once we find a remarkable addition to the inquiry–“do you love Me more than these?” It is a reasonable supposition that those three words “more than these,” were meant to remind Peter of his over-confident assertion–“Though all men deny You, yet I will not.” It is just as if our Lord would say, “Will you now exalt yourself above others? Have you yet learned your own weakness?”

“Do you love Me” may seem at first sight a simple question. In one sense it is so. Even a child can understand love, and can say whether he loves another or not. Yet “Do you love Me” is, in reality, a very searching question. We may know much, and do much, and profess much, and talk much, and work much, and give much, and go through much, and make much show in our religion, and yet be dead before God, from lack of love, and at last go down to the pit. Do we love Christ? That is the great question. Without this there is no vitality about our Christianity. We are no better than painted wax figures, lifeless stuffed beasts in a museum, sounding brass and tinkling cymbals. There is no life where there is no love.

Let us take heed that there is some feeling in our religion. Knowledge, orthodoxy, correct views, regular use of forms, a respectable moral life–all these do not make up a true Christian. There must be some personal feeling towards Christ. Feeling alone, no doubt, is a poor useless thing, and may be here today and gone tomorrow. But the entire absence of feeling is a very bad symptom, and speaks ill for the state of a man’s soul. The men and women to whom Paul wrote his Epistles had feelings, and were not ashamed of them. There was One in heaven whom they loved, and that One was Jesus the Son of God. Let us strive to be like them, and to have some real feeling in our Christianity, if we hope to share their reward.

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I had the privilege this morning of preaching on John 21:18-23. Here is a summary of my sermon in one sentence: Following Jesus involves trusting Him with your future and not comparing yourself to others.

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